Menu JTA Search

Ukrainian Communists Decide on Measures to Improve Economic Condition of Jewish Population

6,000 Families Registered to Settle on Land; to Include Artisans and Small Traders in Relief Program (Jewish Telegraphic Agency)

Measures to improve the distressing economic conditions of the Jewish population in the small towns in the Ukraine were decided on by the Central Executive Committee of the Communist Party in Ukrainia, according to reports received here today from Kieff.

The relief measures provide for facilities to help Jews to settle on the land, to grant support to Jewish workingmen and artisans by furnishing them with tools and materials, to draw Jewish toilers, including the small traders, into the Ukrainian industries, to create a system of schools for technical training and to wage a battle against the lawlessness of the administrative officials in the small towns, particularly in the collection of taxes and the imposition of groundless fines.

The plans adopted by the Central Committee provide for measures to hasten the establishment of Jewish Soviets in villages where the Jewish population is in the majority and to carry on medical and sanitary aid in those districts.

Over 6,000 families registered for settling on the land during the last few months in 23 districts of the Ukraine. One thousand families in Tultchin and in Mogileff Podolsk registered. In Kamienetz Podolsk 1,000 families registered, in Proscuroff 500 families. The rest registered for land settling in the small towns. Seventy-five per cent of those who have registered are able to contribute only ten roubles toward the expense of settling on the land.

DID NOT STUDY JEWISH QUESTION IN POLAND,DR. KEMMERER STATES

Sir:

My recent trip to Poland was made on the invitation of the Polish Government, for the purpose of studying the financial situation with particular reference to the currency and banking problems. I was in Poland only a short time and made no study whatever of the situation of the Jews in Poland. The press despatches you mention that I advised the Polish Government with reference to the currency and banking problems. I was in Poland only a short time and made no study whatever of the situation of the Jews in poland. The press despatches you mention that I advised the Polish Government with reierence to means of improving the economic situation by the abzndomment of the anti-Jewish policy in the economic field were entirely without foundation. I made no such recommeudation and gave no interview to the press with reference to the tinancial situation was the one I gave to the representative of the press on January 10, the day I left Poland.

very truly yours.

E. W. KEMMERER

Princetion University, Jan. 27, 1926.

COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR

Sir:

I wish to express the keen interest I take in awaiting and reading your very useful "Bulletin" of information, that reports so honestly, accurately and concisely the important events, news and problems concerning Jewish daily life.

SOL B. FRIEDMAN, Rzbbi

Cong. Poale Zedeck, Pittsburgh, Pa., January 15, 1926.

Louis Bamberger, prominent merchant and philanthropist, presented the Newark Museum with an early painting of Newark-on-Trent, the English town for which Newark. N. J. was named, it was announced at the annual meeting of the Museum Association. Mr. Bamberger, who was the donor of the new Museum building, shortly to be opened, presented the institution with varied gifts.

Mr. Bamberger, Felix Fuld. Frank L. Liveright and Moses Plaut were among the trustees re-elected at the annual meeting.

Harry F. Guggenheim, formerly U.S.Naval Aviator, and formerly chief Executive of Chile Copper Co., and executive in other mining and metallurgical companies. was elected president of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronauties.

NEXT STORY