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I. O. B. B. is Urged to Reclaim Leadership in American Jewish Life

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The Independent Order B’Nai Brith was urged to reclaim its place of leadership in American Jewish life in the address of Dr. Stephen S. Wise, the principal speaker at the dinner on Sunday night at the Waldorf Astoria, given by Assemblyman Maurice Bloch, President of District No. 1, to presidents and past presidents of lodges and womens’ auxiliaries in the Metropolitan area.

The occasion marked the inauguration of the $500,000 campaign of the Wider Scope Committee in New York.

Piedging his active participation in the campaign, Dr. Wise told the audience that the Hillel Foundations hold ## the hope of saving the intellectual Jewish youth of America for their people and their faith.

Like the B’nai Brith itself, declared Dr. Wise, the Hillel Foundations were not confined to any particular Jewish point of view, but were a cross-section of all Jewry, representing and symbolling the Catholicity of Israel. "I know the work of the Hillel Foundations from my own active contact with them," Dr. Wise stated. "I have visited at least half of those that have been already established and I have seen how potent is their influence in stimulating and fortifying the Jewish con## of our college students. They have brought to them Jewish pride and self-respect and a desire to be at one with and to serve their people. I do not look to the Hillel Foundations to declaim those Jewish snobs and cowards who have left their faith. Let them go. The sooner we are purged of their presence in the house of Israel the better for Israel. But for those who need that stimulus which will help them to remain steadfast, the Hillel Foundations supplies it in abundant measure. I say with full realination of my utterance, that the Hillel Foundations are doing the only effective Jewish work among our student youth and that they deserve the fullest support of all American Jewry."

Announcing that he and Mrs. Wise would contribute to the Wider Scope Campaign. Dr. Wise called upon the B’nai Brith to take its proper place, once more, in American Jewish life, the place, he said, to which it was entitled by virtue of its 80 years of useful service and its potentialities for future service.

Judge Myron Sulzberger, one of the veterans of the B’nai Brith in New York, who was the next speaker, told of the struggle of his own sons, college students, to maintain their Jewish contacts, which were rendered extremely difficult, owing to the absence of a Hillel Foundation at their university. "The appeal of the Wider Scope Committee fires the imagination of every self-respecting Jew just as it touches the soul of every Jewish parent who has sons and daughters at the universities. It deserves our support and shall have it. The B’nai Brith ever at the service of the Jewish people is determined that this campaign shall succeed, not only for the honor of the order but for the honor of Jewry."

Maurice P. Davidson, chairman of the Wider Scope Committee for New York and District No. 1, who was the next speaker, announced that Benjamin Altheimer has accepted the honorary vice-chairmanship of the committee, and Mrs. K. Emily Duschnes had accepted the honorary chairmanship of the women’s division.

Mr. Davidson won applause by pointing out that during the administration of Hon. Maurice Bloch, District No. 1, had taken on new life, "Bloch has instilled it with the yout, the courage and the vitality which are his own attributes," said Mr. Davidson, "and his inspiration is nerving us to go forward to success."

"Great as is the history of B’nai Brith, a still greater day is dawing for it now in this new effort, and we have received so much encouragement already that I am confident we are moving toward success."

Maurice Fleischman, a student at Ann Arbor, and active in the Hillel Foundation of the University of Michigan, told of the great value which the students attach to this Jewish movement. He was followed by Charles Hartman, "grand old man" of District No. 1, Commissioner Henry M. Goldfogle and Prof. Clarence Bachrach.

Dr. Boris D. Bogen, executive secretary of the Wider Scope Committee, announced that Western Jewish communities had already contributed $1,250,000 to the $2,000,000 fund it is seeking.

In bringing the function to a close Assemblyman Bloch said that the opportunity had come to him and those present, to render service not only to the B’nai Brith, but to all Jewry. "Let us not rest on the laurels of the past, but rather let these laurels serve to inspire us to greater work" he declared. "What work can be greater than that of uniting all Jewry in an effort that will develop Jewish leadership. Let our action to-night be such as will make it possible for this purpose to be realized."

UNITED SYNAGOGUE IN N. Y. HOLDS ANNUAL CONVENTION

The annual convention of the New York State Branch of the United Synagogue, with which eighty congregations are affiliated, was held on Sunday at Temple Anshe Chesed. An administrative committee was elected, authorized to name from among its members a president, to succeed Albert Rosenblatt, who resigned.

Among the resolutions adopted at the sessions was a decision to allot $2,500 toward the maintenance of the Jewish Students House at Columbia University for 1928. Another resolution provided that the governing board of the Jewish Students House at Columbia be authorized to invite the cooperation of the Hillel Foundation in its work "on such a basis as will be in accord with the aims of the United Synagogue so that both organizations may work in harmony."

The convention also decided to extend its activities in upper New York State, particularly with regard to college students and boy scouts.

The officers elected are: Dr. Cyrus Adler, Honorary President; Bernard Breithart, of Mt. Vernon, Albert Goldfarb Mt. Vernon, Albert Goldfarb, Staten Island; Al Hart, Rochester; M. S. Lieberman, Utica; Isaac Markben, Syracuse; Sol Mutterperl, Charles Polakoff, Buffalo; Louis Rsoenberg, Dr. Norman Salit, Far Rockaway; and Henry Seinfel, Brooklyn, were elected Vice Presidents. Joseph Durst, Treasurer and Rabbi Samuel M. Cohen, Secretary.

The administrative committee includes: Harry Falk, Leo J. Goldberger, Leon Kahn, Nathan Levy, Sol Mutterperl, Albert Rosenblett, Bon Ruttenberg and Nathan D. Shapiro of New York City; Max Weill, Bernard Breithard and Edward C. Weinrib of Mt. Vernon: Maxwell James of New Rochelle Charles Polskoff, Buffalo; Louis Shulman of Rochester; Morris Bolloff of Syracuse and Samuel Reichler of Utica.

The convention also decided to create an Executive Council to consist of the rabbis, the presidents and one other member of all the affiliated congregations.

The convention also decided to create an executive council to consist of the rabbis, the presidents and one other member of all the affiliated congregations.

Dr. Norman Salit, Rabbi of the Jewish Center of Far Rockaway and President of the Long Island District of the United Synagogue, was one of the speakers at the sessions. Mrs. Eva Levy, acting president of the New York City branch of the Women’s League, presented a report on the women’s activities. The work for the Jewish Boy Scouts was described in a report by Dr. David A. Goldstein.

Dr. Ray W. Wyland, educational director of the Boy Scouts of America, praised the work of the United Synagogue among Jewish Boy Scouts.

Rabbi David Lefkowitz of Dalas was elected to succeed Rabbi Abraham I. Schechter of Houston as president of the Kallah, organization of Texas rabbis founded a year ago, at the closing session of the second annual convention held in Beaumont, Texas.

Other officers elected are Rabbi Samuel Rosinger of Beaumant, vice-president, and Rabbi Harry A Merfeld of Fort Wortls, secy.

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