Polish Government Organs Condemn Antisemitic Practices

(J. T. A. Mail Service)

A strong condemnation of anti-Semitism, especially as demonstrated recenty at the annual convention of physicians held at Ciechocinek this month, when the Jewish physicians attending found themselves segregated from the rest of the delegates and left the Conference in protest, is made in articles published by the Government organs, “Glos Pravdy” and “Eko.”

“Anti-Semitism,” they write, “is without question one of the most foolish and most animal forms of Nationalism. Foolish because in modern society it can never attain its aim, and instead of weakening those against whom it fights, it strengthens them. And animal because it arouses the lowest instincts of people and destroys all human feeling. In Poland,” they proceed, “anti-Semitism has been spread by the Endeks (National Democratic Party), which has poisoned the soul of the people with anti-Semitism, exploited as a political weapon with which to mislead the masses.

“The Endek spirit is still dominant in the secondary and higher schools in the law courts, and in the libteral professions. Anti-Semitism follows the line of least resistance. It acts as a narcotic, lulling the people to sleep, and it is a greater danger than what it purports to fight. Also anti-Semitism has no true relation to the real feeling of the people towards the Jews. We therefore regard it as an essential task of the State to put down this anti-Semitism and to solve the Jewish question, which anti-Semitism like its colleague–Jewish Chauvinism–only renders more acute, but can never alleviate.”

Referring to what happened at Ciechocinek, the papers say: “No one wants to compel the Endeks to meet with Jews or to compel Jews to meet with Endeks. That is their own private affair. But if the people who are responsible for what happened in Ciechocinek think that Poland is an Endek Club, the sooner they get the idea out of their heads the better. Scientific conferences which are held under the patronage of the State must not be turned into an occasion for the Endeks to demonstrate their idea of what constitutes gentlemanly behavior. If the public sees the kind of thing that goes on at these conferences of medical men, lawyers, engineers, etc., it will soon lose all its respect for the professional ability of these people. We certainly think that the State ought to take up this matter and teach a lesson to those who are responsible for what took place at Ciechocinek.”

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