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Communication to the Editor

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Sir:

In re your article of today regarding the decision of the Supreme Court of Georgia which reversed the action of a jury commissioner in excluding Jews from the jury panels. I beg to advise you of a decision of our Appellate Division, rendered in 1927, which may be of interest to your readers.

Our commissioner of jurors excluded a man from the jury list because of alleged religious prejudices. The Appellate Division reversed the decision of the commissioner of jurors, stating that pursuant to Section 13 of the Civil Rights Law of the State of New York no citizen, otherwise qualified, shall be disqualified as a juror on account of “creed.” Therefore the commissioner had no right to exclude from the jury list anyone unless he was not intelligent and that “intelligent” as used in the Judiciary Law of New York means “possessed of ordinary information and reasoning faculty.”

LOUIS LANDE.

New York, April 15, 1929.

A dinner of the United Palestine Appeal in Mapleton Park, resulted in the pledging of more than $10,000 by the guests present. Of the sum, more than $7,000 of the contributions was received in cash.

Albert Ottinger was the guest of honor and principal speaker. An address was made by Rabbi Hirsch Orliansky of Mapleton Park Hebrew Institute. E. J. Silverberg, Chairman of the executive committee, introduced Samuel Lipson, who presided as toastmaster. Joseph Rosenberg, campaign chairman, reported on the progress of the campaign.

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