Communists Charge Aron Scheinman with Demoralization Policy

Aron Scheinman, former director of the Soviet State Bank who recently visited the United States in behalf of the Soviet finance institution and, losing belief in Communism, refused to return to Russia, resulting in his dismissal from the post, was declared at a Communist party trial which ended today, “responsible for a scandalous demoralization discovered among Communist employees in the State Bank.”

Thirteen employees of the Bank, members of the Communist party, were expelled from the party by the verdict of the party court, as a result of these discoveries. T. Gurevitch who succeede Scheinman in the post of a member of the Executive Committee of the party after Scheinman’s resignation, was sentenced by the party court to expulsion from the party, having been found “guilty of continuing Scheinman’s demoralization policy.”

The party court established that the thirteen expelled employees were guilty of stealing banknotes from packages while counting them, of hooliganism, drunkenness, misuse of bank funds and misconduct. The demoralibation, it was charged, was due to the policy of Mr. Scheinman who, it was alleged, surrounded himself “with loyal employees barricading the bank against the entrance of Communists and demoralizing even Communist party members who were employed in the bank.”

It was further revealed at the trial that an attempt was made last winter to oust Mr. Scheinman from the Executive Committee of the Moscow district of the Communist party, but without success. The appointment of S. Karp, a Communist, as Acting Commissar of Finances, was announced today.

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