Freedom from Bias Cited in Columbia’s Growth

Columbia University owes its growth in religious and spiritual life to its freedom from sectarianism and denominational bias, declared Chaplain Raymond C. Knox in preaching in St. Paul’s Chapel at the special service in connection with the celebration of the one hundred and seventy-fifth year of the founding of the institution.

Adherence to this policy, he declared, has given the university an outstanding influence in the promotion of religious thought untrammeled by the differences in theological thought that were rife at the time it was founded.

“While this university was formulated at a time when controversy was rife, the design of its founders was to lift it above the level of narrow partisanship.

“Students come to us of differing religious inheritance, from every land and every race. Here it has been demonstrated that religion is a bond of sympathy and understanding among them, and not a cause of division and controversy.”

Dr. Joseph H. Hertz, Chief Rabbi of the British Empire, will be one of the 47 recipients of the University Medal established by the trustees of Columbia University and given for the first time to accord recognition to outstanding achievement by alumni of foreign birth, at the University Convocation on Thursday, concluding the seven-day celebration of the 175th anniversary of the founding of Columbia as Kings College in 1754.

Portraits of Edwin R. A. Seligman and Gershom Seixas, were included in a group of 40 canvasses of Columbia notables who have figured prominently in the history of the college from its inception to the present day.

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