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Possibility Laws Against Religious-education in Russia May Be Modified

Modification of the oppressive laws against religious education under the Soviet government is a possibility, it was announced at a meeting of the Board of Jewish Deputies yesterday by O. E. D’Avigdor Goldsmid, president. The steps were taken as a result of a correspondence carried on by Mr. Goldsmid and the late Louis Marshall. The negotiations are still confidential. An announcement will be made shortly.

The meeting heard a number of reports on conditions in Palestine and East European countries. Nathan Laski, Chairman of the Palestine Committee, reported that in view of the investigation being carried on by the Commission of Inquiry, he is unable to discuss the Palestine situation. The report of the Joint Foreign Committee declared that the chief Jewish question before the League, at its last ses-

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sion, was the Palestine question which was the subject of a lengthy debate.

Lucien Wolf, Secretary of the Joint Foreign Committee, reported that negotiations with the Norwegian Premier Mowinckle to repeal the anti-Schechita law were unsuccessful, but that the Premier had promised to aid the Jewish community in securing Kosher meat.

Jews in Croatia are finding it difficult to obtain nationality certificates from Jugoslavia, Mr. Wolf reported, declaring that under the new nationality law no account is taken of the minorities treaties signed by Serbia in 1919. The situation is further aggravated, he stated by the impression in official quarters that Jews constitute a separate nationality with Ladino as their national language. The Joint Foreign Committee and the Alliance Israelite Universelle supplied the Croatian Jews with a declaration of their rights under the Minorities treaties, he said. If the government fails to satisfy their claims, action will be taken with the League of Nations, he declared.

Due to the recurrence of anti-Jewish student outbreaks in Roumania and complaints that discriminating legislation had been passed, the Joint Foreign Committee intervened with the Roumanian Government. Following the interview of Mr. Wolf with Minister Madegearu order was restored, making further intervention unnecessary, Mr. Wolf reported.

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