Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society Celebrating End of Quarter Century of Great Achievements in Colo

Spivak is celebrating quietly a quarter of a century of achievement. The closing of the year 1929, means that the great Jewish Consumptives” Relief Society of Denver, Colo-which is located here, is bringing to a turn its first twenty-five years of existence.

This veritable city of many large, modern hospital buildings, extensive farms paved streets, its own stores, library, post-office, work-shops, etc, is a living witness to the magnificent things accomplished by the Jewish Consumptives” Relief Society since the day it was founded in 1904 in the City of Denver, by a handful of men and women with no resources beyond a fund of $1.10, with no facilities beyond a few tents. It is a living witness to a devotion to only one purpose-the cure and relief of those stricken by tuberculosis.

The doors of the Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society are open, up to its full capacity, to all tuberculars. No case is too advanced for the Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society. No one is too poor to enter its sanatorium, for everything is absolutely free. No red tape no unpleasant delays are placed in the way of those applying for entrance.

The year 1929 has been notable for many new achievements. The new Texas Building a pavilion for women, has been completed. This is a splendid $400,000 structure. The Max D. Neusteter Industrial Building was formally dedicated this year. This building houses classes and work-shops in which rehabilitation work is being pursued to prepare patients for suitable work after they will have been discharged. The new Eastern Branch at Highland Mills, N. Y. is rapidly becoming a reality. Plans are quickly taking shape. The early completion of the branch institution, which is so vitally needed is expected.

For the coming year the Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society plans further expansions. A building is proposed to house the ex-patients, many of them employees of the institution. This will prove a very important step forward in the Society’s post-sanatorium work. Another building is contemplated to contain a new kitchen and dining quarters-both very essential.

The Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society stands at the end of its first quarter-century of existence, a great monument to American Jewry. It has given relief to thousands of men and women stricken by the grimmest of diseases. It has served its patients with the utmost of medical skill modern science commands, with the most tender consideration, with no charge of any nature to any patients.

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