University Antisemitism in America: Jewish Students at Maryland College Compelled to Seek Safety in

An antisemitic attack on Jewish students at an American University, is reported to-day from College Park University in the State of Maryland. Bricks were thrown through the windows of the dormitories in the dwellings of the Jewish students, compelling them to seek safety in an adjoining friendly society house.

The University paper, reporting the occurrence, demands the expulsion of the guilty students. President Pearson, the Principal of the University, has appointed his special Assistant, Dr. H. C. Byrd, to make a thorough investigation into the affair.

In October 1929, Havard University was seething over an attack made there on several Jewish students, and the University paper, “The Crimson”, published an article protesting against the outrage. The incidents occurred at Harvard University’s most exclusive club, to which some of the leading men in America belonged when they were students. One of the students, named George Clark, started the trouble by shouting “I don’t like kikes”, and delivered a speech against Jewish students, which almost resulted in an anti-Jewish riot. Cries of protest were raised by other students, and Clark was finally quietened, after he had tried to drive away all young men he thought were Jews.

In 1927 there was a great deal of excitement in America over an incident which occurred in a New York public hospital, when three Jewish physicians, who were serving there as internes, complained that a group of non-Jewish internes had entered their dormitory during the night and tortured them. Several of the non-Jewish internes were arrested, and afterwards publicly apologised to their Jewish associates. The accusation made by the Jewish internes that there was intense anti-Jewish bias at the hospital led to a number of investigations, one of which was conducted by the New York City Special Commissioner of Accounts, who submitted a report in which he stated his conclusion that the charges of anti-Jewish discrimination at the hospital were well-founded.

Charges of discrimination against Jews at American universities have been repeatedly made over a period of many years. As far back as 1922 the announcement of a restrictive plan for the admission of students to Harvard University aroused a discussion in which it was complained that the real purpose was to limit the number of Jewish students, and the Boston City Council, in whose area Harvard University is situated, unanimously adopted a resolution condemning the Harvard authorities for alleged discrimination against Jewish students.

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