Dismisses Injunction Against Anti-semitic Papers; Regrets Compelled to Do So Under Law

Justice Desaulniers yesterday dismissed the application for an injunction to restrain the owners and editors of the Goglu publications from continuing their campaigns against the Jews, expressing at the same time regret that the law left him no alternative but to do so.

Justice Desaulniers in dismissing the application of E. Abagov, a Jewish merchant of Lachine, handed down a slashing indictment of anti-Semitic campaigns in general and those of the Goglu publications in particular. The anti-Semitic incitement was termed by the Justice as “anti-Christian, audacious and tending to stir up rioting and misdemeanor.”

He castigated the publishers of anti-Semitic papers for failing to heed the warning not to continue their incitement. All citizens, he said, are interested in good social order and expressed regret that the publishers are persisting in their action.

Justice Desaulniers cited from the historical records concerning the persecution of the Jews, particularly in Russia, declaring that the raising of a ritual murder allegation against the Jews might be sufficient to let loose events which have the most terrible consequences.

Speaking of the Jews, the Justice said that the Jewish race is marvelously endowed else it could not survive the empires which enslaved them.

He deplored the fact that the law has not placed in the hands of the magistrate the necessary implements to keep anti-Semitic campaigns within decent limits. Had the bill introduced in the Legislature by the Jewish Deputy Peter Bercovitch been adopted, he would have had the power to grant the injunction.

The decision, although expected, has nevertheless caused disappointment in Jewish circles.

A suit to collect damages may be entered against the publications. The bill of Deputy Bercovitch may also be introduced again in the provincial legislature.

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