Farm School to Accept Large Class This Spring

The Freshman class to be admitted to National Farm School this Spring will consist of 85 students, an increase of 25 students over classes admitted during the last few years, it was announced by Herbert D. Allman, president.

The decision was reached by the Board of the School at a meeting this week, when statistics were presented, showing the large number of boys out of school who can find no employment and are roaming the country without guidance. This is one of the first practical gestures offered, toward the alleviation of what promises to become a national problem of boy delinquency. The decision to accept this larger number was made, notwithstanding the fact, that the School, dependent upon public subscription for its support, has a difficult financial struggle to carry on its work.

A three-years’ training of 36 consecutive months in practical and scientific agriculture is offered deserving boys. In addition to tuition, board, room, books, laboratory supplies and other perquisites, as well as moral and ethical guidance, are furnished practically free.

The record of the School indicates that a large percentage of its graduates are successfully following agriculture as their careers.

Any boy over 17 years of age, having completed all or part of a high school course, who evidences a desire to follow agriculture as a vocation, is eligible for admission. The Admissions Committee is now considering applicants for the new class, which enters the School, March 22.

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