J. D. B. News Letter

Seventy-nine new undergraduates were matriculated at the Hebrew University last month, bringing the total student body up to about 200, of whom fourteen are taking the post-graduate course in the Faculty of Humanities. Of the 79 newcomers, fifty-five were enrolled in the Faculty and twenty-four in the Division of Biological Studies.

Dr. J. L. Magnes, the Chancellor, presided over the Matriculation Ceremony and reported some statistics on the student body. Professor A. Fodor, head of the Department of Biological and Colloidal Chemistry, delivered a lecture on “The Catalytic Activity of Organisms.” He was followed by Professor Samuel Klein, who holds the Sol Rosenbloom Chair of Palestine Research, and is dean of the Faculty of Humanities, who read the list of recipients of scholarships and prizes. The new undergraduates were then individually greeted by the Chancellor, and were formally inducted into the student body.

A gathering arranged by the Students’ Organization at the University was held later in the large Symonds Memorial Hall of the Jewish National and University Library, some four hundred people taking part. A piquant feature of the occasion was a debate between Nahum Sokolow president of the World Zionist Organization, and M. M. Ussishkin, chairman of the Jewish National Fund Directorate, on the significance of the State, which aroused great interest.

A lecture by Professor L. A. Mayer on “The Beginnings and Development of Islamic Archaeology” marked the inauguration of the Sassoon David Chair of Near Eastern Art and Archaeology, which has been endowed at the Hebrew University by Sir Percival David, Bart of London and Bombay, in memory of his late father, Sir Sassoon David, Bart., who passed away in 1926.

Professor Leon Roth’s subject for this year’s Achad Ha’Am Memorial Lecture was “De Erroribus,” delivered on January 25th. Professor Roth, who holds the Achad Ha’Am Chair in Philosophy, is the translator of the Hebrew edition of “Aristotle’s Metaphysics,” which was recently published by the Hebrew University Press. This is the first time that the work has been translated directly from the Greek into Hebrew.

The prominence and recognition of the teachers at the University is indicated to a gratifying extent by the fact that it is becoming quite usual for its professors to be invited either to lecture or to assist in researches abroad. The most recent example of this is that of Professor Sol Adler, head of the

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