Philadelphia Woman Named Welfare Sec’y but Does Not Disregard Duties As Housewife

Mrs. ### Albert Liveright, who has been ###andling $40,000,000 of state funds annually, was finally confirmed as secretary of Welfare by the Penn-###ylvania State Legislature Wednesday night.

Behind this brief news item is a ###tory of triumph of personality over ###olitics; of victory for public serv-###ce over petty servility. For almost ###hree years Mrs. Liveright has been ###erving as Pennsylvania’s Secretary ###f Welfare, by the Governor’s appointment, despite repeated refusal ###f the State Senate to confirm this appointment. Incidentally, she is ###he first Jewess in Pennsylvania to ###old the job, one of trust and responsibility. By virtue of her position she is a member of the cabinet ###f one of the most colorful personalities in American public life to-###y, Governor Gifford Pinchot.

Mrs. Liveright is not a politician ###never was and in all likelihood, ###ever will be. Not until the day of ###er appointment early in 1931 was ###t generally known that politically she belonged to the Socialist party. ### Her appointment was in no sense ### political. In fact it came as a complete surprise to those who are supposed to be “in the know” in Pennsylvania politics. The politicians were annoyed and refused to give ###her official ratification. Every time ###her name was presented action was ###deferred.

The Jewish community of Philadelphia is proud of her, for she is one of their very own, a Philadelphia Jewess risen from the ranks to the highest position to which a worker in the field of social service might aspire.

Born in Philadelphia, December 18, 1882, Mrs. Liveright received her early education in private schools and continued her higher studies at the University of Pennsylvania, the Drexel Institute and the Pennsylvania School of Social and Health Work. At the age of 24 she married I. Albert Liveright, a Philadelphia clothing manufacturer.

Marriage did not put an end to her interest and active participation in social service. On the contrary, it intensified it. To this day she is of the opinion women should not abandon all outside interests and devote themselves exclusively to home keeping after marriage.

Being a Jewess and coming from an old Jewish family, her first interest was in the direction of Jewish social service. It was not long before she became an outstanding personality. Her experience and her counsel were sought by the various agencies operating on behalf of the Philadelphia Jewish community, with the result that she served as president of the Juvenile Aid Society from 1920 to 1925; was chairman of the All-Philadelphia Conference in 1928, a member of the Board of the Federation of Jewish Charities from 1926 to 1931. In addition she found time to contribute interesting papers to various social service magazines.

In the three years she has been in office, Mrs. Liveright has convinced ### political opponents that she is a woman of exceptional ability serving the State of Pennsylvania fearlessly and without favoritism—a source of pride to the Governor who appointed her and to the people whence she sprung. Her ultimate confirmation by the State Senate means just that.

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