Anti-german Boycott Here Opens English Market, Paper Says

The New York correspondent for The Daily Express here has in a recent dispatch communicated the message that “the recent whispering campaign activities of Jewish organizations in New York to force a total boycott of German goods has opened to British manufacturers a sudden and unexpected market opportunity.”

The writer enumerates the products almost all of which, he says, can be imported from countries other than Germany and especially from Great Britain, where prices are moderate.

He draws the conclusion that “it was price rather than exceptional quality” which opened the German market to American buyers, and pointedly asks that British manufacturers take special pains to “fit their prices to American consumers.”

Articles enumerated by the British correspondent which were hitherto chiefly imported from the Reich and which are available in England, include locks, luggage, cotton goods, fancy luggage, rugs, leather small goods chinaware, etc.

“New York stores have come to regard Germany as the natural source of low-priced small cutlery, for instance,” writes the Express correspondent. “Why”, asks the New York buyer, cannot the English cutlers supply us with a full line of substitutes for the German article at a price which, though it might not precisely meet the landed German price, would be near enough to alienate the customer who expects to pay about the German price, but will readily pay a little more for higher-grade British counterparts.”

The writer avows a belief that “America will cheerfully welcome British replacements of German goods”, adding that the quoted prices on British goods “must be drawn with respect to the prevailing American retail price habit.”

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