The Bulletin’s Day Book

Loyalty, gratitude and hoesty are qualities that come in for a lot of tossing about these days. Old Staats-Zeitung employers are now reminiscing back to the days of the War when Hans Heinz Ewers, shabbily clad and penniless, was peddling his verses in the hope of a square meal. Neither his versed nor his prose earned him many square meals until the two Jewish sisters and their millions discovered him, took him to their home, lavished their attention, care and money on him and gave him his first push up the ladder to fame as a writer and poet.

Today, the “well known writer” Hans Heinz Ewers is one of Adolf Hitler’s staunch lieutenants, directing this or that field of publicity.

One night at dinner in Bucharest some years ago, the American Consul General E. E. Palmer, wrote one of his famous cocktail recipes on the back of his calling card and handed it to S. C. Lamport, hisguest. That night, Mr. Lamport lift Cucharest in the company of an Amercan-Jewish journalist whose reports on the treatment of the Jews in Rumania had been anything but friendly toward the Rumania government. Frontier officials were about to act on orders to arrest the American journalist when Mr. Lamport energetically jumped into play in his own inimitable manner flashing the cocktail recipe in the faces of the officials. The bewidered officials, at their wits end, unable to cope with cocktail recipes inscribed on the card of the American consul, bowed Mr. Lamport, with the meek journalist in his wake, back into their train compartment.

Mr. Lamport, his journalist friend and had reason to rejoice over Consul General Palmer’s famous cocktail recipes, will be happy to learn that Ely Elliot Palmer was appointed Consul General at Jerusalem. A youngish man and a genial character of much charm and wit, he has attracted a host of friends. In Bucharest, Mr. Palmer availed himself of his excellent opportunity to study East European Jewish conditions. His sympathetic and intelligent approach to all Jewish problems makes his appointment to Jerusalem a fortunate one.

Satirizing on the many reports emanating from official German sources tending to prove a rise in exports and increased commerce for that country and European newspaper prints the following report of a conversation between two idle members of the working class standing on the wharves in Hamburg.

First Worker: “See how our port teems with activity, see the porters loading and unloading at our wharves, see the ships entering and leaving the port!” Second Worker: “You must be crazy! I don’t see any of those things.”

First Worker: “Don’t you read the newspaper?”

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