Among the Literati

The book business in Germany, once a model for booksellers the world over, is in the dumps. Ever since the Reich censorship was imposed people have been staying away from the book-shops in increasing numbers. The reason for tuis concentrated absence is not difficult to ascertain. Publsihers are permitted to issue only those books which gain the approval of the Government and the boys in power see that the German people get only those books which have kind things to say about the regime. Criticism is, of course, taboo but what little business the shops do comes from the sales of banned volumes. This “under the counter” selling is the only thing counter” selling is the only thing keeping the stores open. It is done at a great risk for both seller and buyer but the Nazi snoopers are unable to stop it.

Ostensibly the best seller is Herr Hitler’s “My Battle,” but then every boostore in Germany is forced to buy and display the book. Next in importance come the score or more of tomes that praise the “Leader.” Recently, Dr. Otto Dietrich who seems to be a glorified valet to Adelf wrote one called “With Hitler to Power.” It has been marked in advance as the next best seller. Another type of book being forced on the public is typified by the tome of our dear friend Joe Goebbels who has written an account of how he captured Berlin from the Socialists and Bolshies. Even the Nazi minister of Agriculture, Walter Dare, has written a come in praise of the new regime. He calls his effusion “New Nobility of Blood and Soil. Dr. Alfred Rosenberg, whose specialty is Jew-baiting, is one of the most prolific of the Nazi writers. His latest is “The Myth of the Twentieth Century.” Rosenberg’s actions, if they weren’t scdastardly in effect, would be funny. He is gent who rants on and on about the sacredness of everything German. Incidentally he was born and raised in Russia and has born and raised in Russia and has only been a German citizen for a score or so years.

With the exception of Spengler there are practically no German authos of international reputation whose works are permitted in the country but the publishing houses of Holland, France and Switzerland are supplying those Germans who wish to have reading matter not entirely concerned with the glorification of Hitlerism.

REMARKS OF ONE SORT AND ANOTHER

Sam Ornitz, who is editing the autobiography of Rose Pastor Stokes, promises the completed manuscript ready for the completed manuscript ready for the anxious printer by June 1. . . Emma Goldman, whose two-volume autobiography didn’t sell nearly as well as Mr. Knopf expected, will be reissued (the book of course) in one volume at a greatly reduced price . . . The Richard Massock who was reported in the papers as having been injured in the riots in Paris is the same slim, neverous fellow who a few years ago was book editor of the Associated Press, for which organization he was serving in Paris when hurt . . . Borman Burnstine the large couraggeous young man who was arrested in the recnet fracas at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel because he attempted to aid the cause of the striking hotel employees, is Alfred King’ editor and publicity man. Aben Kandel is back from Hollywood and again at work upon that Novel of New York . . . Abo Lerner who once Worked for Simon & Schuster is now in C{SPAN}#{/SPAN} working on a radical paper {SPAN}#{/SPAN} the “Farmers Weekly” . . .

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