Now–editorial Notes

THE Nazi demonstration in Gunzenhausen, Bavaria, which resulted in the death of two Jews, Jacob Rosenfelder and Max Rosenau, accentuates the tragedy of the Jews in Germany, especially in the smaller communities, where every Jew is known to the rest of the population, and where his shop or home can be easily attacked by the Nazi rowdies. Jacob Rosenfelder hanged himself immediately after the Nazi demonstrations, and Max Rosenau was found dead from four knife wounds. It is reported that eleven Jews were arrested during the demonstrations staged by the Storm Troops, on the charge that a Jew expectorated on a Storm Trooper’s uniform, and that all those arrested were soon released. Even the Nazi authorities had to admit the absurdity of the charge. Thus far we have received no report of any arrests of Nazis guilty of the murder of Rosenau and of the demonstration which led to the murder.

On the eve of the demonstration, The Fraenkiche Tageszeitung published an editorial in which it said: “Tell me from whom you are buying and I will tell you who you are.”

When pogroms were organized by the Tsarist government, the Russian hooligans and peasants were given plenty of vodka, and they proceeded with their dastardly work under the influence of drink. The Russian masses were really not anti-Semitic. The press of the world was aroused when a pogrom occurred. The Tsarist government was denounced in the sharpest terms.

When a pogrom occurs in Germany–for the Nazi demonstration in Gunzenhausen which resulted in murder was nothing else than a pogrom–the general press treats it as an ordinary every day occurrence. Atrocities in Naziland have lost their news value. In civilized countries people are no longer surprised at any manifestations of brutality under the Hitler regime.

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