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Berlin Nazis Injure U.S. Jews

Whether it’s local, domestic or foreign, if it’s news about Jewish life you’ll find it in the Jewish Daily Bulletin.

terday declared von Papen’s elimination from the cabinet to be but a matter of hours, guardedly stated today that this may not take place at all.

HINDENBURG BACKING SEEN

The apparent indecision on the part of Hitler and his cabinet gave credence to reports yesterday that von Hindenburg, in warning Hitler that the Reichswehr was being held directly responsible for the safety of von Papen (a report which the Propaganda Ministry promptly denied), had indicated that he would stand by his intimate friend and adviser.

Informed circles here today believed that the aged President would exert his full authority in behalf of von Papen and that as a result the Hitler-Goering-Goebbels triumvirate, instead of dictating the course of the Reich, would have to adopt a moderate course closer to that demanded by the conservative elements in the Reich than to the Nazi political and economic program. This is all the more likely if the President adopts a firm stand because of Hitler’s dependence on the Reichswehr to remain in power since the denouements of the past weekend established defections in the ranks of his private storm troop army.

Chancellor Hitler today acted to end the reign of terror prevailing in Germany since Saturday when he announced the termination of special measures to quell the storm troop uprising. He declared that the summary courts which had sat in judgment in the executions of the storm troop leaders and others would give way to civil courts.

“LESS THAN 60″ DIED

The official death list, made public today, declared that the total was “less than sixty” although unofficial estimates still put the figure in excess of 200.

Munich, seat of the Nazi party and locale for the storm troops’ outbreaks, was quiet today, with an undetermined number of its S. A. men and leaders reported still under arrest. The storm troops, morale shaken and influence dealt a body blow, were still further humiliated today by the abolition of their press department, which had attacked the Stahlhelm after Hitler had specifically ordered attacks on the veterans to cease.

The quietest day since Hitler’s dramatic appearance at Munich and Wiensee Saturday, the day gave an opportunity for taking inventory on the whirlwind developments which have whipped Germany into a ferment and shaken the Hitler regime to its foundations.

ACTION POORLY PLANNED

There was almost general acknowledgement that the government’s excuse for the strong action it took was faulty and poorly planned. It is felt it breaks the whole aura carefully laid around the leadership of the Nazi party and the nation, with general mistrust aroused as a consequence. It is felt the government should have come out openly with the explanation that the reign of terror was a political struggle, and to protect the confidence of the people, nothing should have been said about sex corruption.

Be that as it may, mixed feelings are held toward the government today among those formerly unquestionably its supporters. While there is a sense of relief at the elimination of such men from power as Roehm, Heines, Ernst and others, nevertheless, the ruthlessness with which the government moved and the situation its actions revealed have profoundly stirred the general population. The strict censorship enforced and the inability of the population to learn just what has happened in Germany have given wing to hundreds of rumors which have had the effect of intensifying uncertainty and unrest.

Whether it’s local, domestic or foreign, if it’s news about Jewish life you’ll find it in the Jewish Daily Bulletin.

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