Rothermere Splits with Fascists

fore, are unacceptable as members of our organization. We are certainly not prepared to relax our attitude towards the Jews in view of the fact that last year eighty per cent of persons convicted of physical attacks against Fascists were found to be Jews while the Jewish community here represents only six per cent of the entire population.”

To this letter Rothermere has made the following public reply:

“I made it quite clear in my conversation with you that I never could support any movement with anti-Semitic bias. I never thought that the political situation in England bears any resemblance to the political situation either in Italy or Germany.”

Publication of this correspondence between the two confirms the reports in London political circles during the past few weeks of a disagreement between Mosley and his chief backer. During this time, Rothermere papers have featured many editorials denouncing anti-Semitism and against any restrictions of Jewish rights in the British Isles.

Before Rothermere lifted the Black Shirt banner last January 15 with a full-page leader captioned “Hurrah for the Black-shirts,” the Mosley organization was comparatively unknown and had only a handful of followers.

Recently at Albert Hall, before more than 10,000 sympathizers, the Fascist leader warned Jews in vigorous language that they must place England before all else or suffer Fascist wrath.

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