Doctor Stops, Starts Hearts by Nerve Action

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By stopping and starting again the heart movements of several of his patients, Dr. M. H. Nathanson of this city presented one of the most widely discussed demonstrations before physicians attending the Minnesota State Medical association’s annual meeting in Duluth which ended yesterday.

Using an amplifying device to carry the sound of the heartbeat to his patients, stopping their heartbeats for several seconds. After applying several drugs, including adrenalin, he caused the resumption of the heart movement.

In outlining his demonstration, Dr. Nathanson pointed out that work on this particular experiment had been prompted by an analysis of 142 autopsies on coronary disease terminating in sudden death. In only seven per cent of these cases, he said, was a heart condition found incompatible with life. This being true, he set about to determine if certain drugs might not be used at least to postpone angina pectoris. His experiments, he said, proved this possible.

At the same gathering another Minneapolis physician, Dr. M. J. Shapiro, gave an address on juvenile rheumatism. Youngsters between six and seven years old are most often the victims, he said, usually in the fall or spring, in cases studied here. He drew a sharp distinction between so-called “growing pains” and rheumatic fever. No effective specific treatment has been discovered, Dr. Shapiro added.

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