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Powers Plan No Action on Austria

The feeling in diplomatic quarters here is that, for the present at least, no untoward action will be taken by any of the three nations. Beyond a policy of watchful waiting, the governments upon which depends the future peace of Europe seem resolved to let the situation iron itself out as a purely local incident, although with inevitable international significance and complications.

Contributing toward the feeling are the following factors, as pointed out in official circles:

The loyal Austrian troops seem to have taken complete control of the situation in Vienna and are well on the way toward eliminating, at least for the time being, the sporadic and evidently disconnected outbreaks in such provinces as Styria.

The presence of large bodies of Italian troops within striking distance of Austria, despite the assurance of the Italian government that it plans no direct action, constitutes a threat to the Nazi rebels who still have some idea of carrying yesterday’s putsch into the proportions of a real revolt.

The slaying of Dollfuss is believed to have acted as a fatal boomerang to the Nazi cause in Austria. This belief is substantiated by the failure of a really concerted revolt to develop out of what was evidently intended by the Nazis to be a signal for a major movement.

In further support of the conviction that the Nazi uprising, except for the accomplishment of its purpose of slaying the Chancellor, was a total failure, Sir John Simon, British Foreign Secretary, today addressed the House of Commons. He said that the Nazi strength in Austria was considerably exaggerated.

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