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Society Notes

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Mr. and Mrs. Norman Goldberger of Long Branch, N. J., gave a dinner party Friday evening for Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Leeds, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Kottek, Mr. and Mrs. Adam Gimbel, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Goldsmith and Mr. and Mrs. Horace Horner.

The Century Country Club sent a team of golfers to play against the Hollywood Golf Club team at the latter course last Sunday. Messrs. Robert Jacobson, Herbert Kottek, John Sherman, L. C. Leeds, Justin Bijur, James Linburn, Allan T. Burleigh and Kiefer Newman played for Hollywood. The Century team consisted of Messrs. Car Loeb Jr., Theodore Lowenstein, John Herrman, Richard Bernheim, Walter Liebman Jr., George Spiegelberg, Arthur K. Harris and Clifford Frank. The final score was 11—1 in favor of Hollywood. After the match refreshments were served on the veranda of the clubhouse.

At the dance at the Hollywood last Saturday night the attendance was less numerous than usual, despite the fact that the visitors from the Century Golf Club, who came down for the golf match, attended the affair. The usual thunder shower around dinner time may have been the reason for the decrease in the number of guests. One of Ben Bernie’s orchestras played. Among those who had tables for dinner we noted Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wimpfheimer, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Goldsmith, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goldman Jr., Mr. and Mrs. E. Bernheimer, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Herman.

However, at the club itself, after supper, one met as gay a crowd as one could wish. Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Miller and their week-end guests, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kohn and Miss Louise Woolner, were there; Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Dillenberg, Mr. and Mrs. William Ehrich, Mr. John Rothstone, Mr. and Mrs. Elson Guiterman, Miss Evelyn Sonn, Miss Margery Kaufman, Mr. Donald Klopfer, Mr. Harold Wimpfheimer and Mr. Justin Bijur.

TEACH BOYS TO COOK?

Hadassah reports from Palestine indicate an unusual controversy that is occupying the attention of educators in those parts— to wit, the question of whether boys should be taught to cook in the schools. Under the Hadassah school luncheon system in Palestine more than 4,500 pupils are fed, and the upper grades are taught to prepare, cook and serve daily luncheons. Further plans are being formulated to extend the service and teaching to all of the Jewish Agency schools, embracing 34,000 children.

With the plan of expansion, the question of teaching cooking to boys has been reopened, and Hadassah workers are valiantly opposing the traditional male resistance to the subject. Among their arguments are the facts that oriental life, with the purchasing power totally in the hands of the master of the house, necessitates the latter’s knowledge of what happens to the foodstuffs after they are bought. Again, in the agricultural colonies that play so important a part in Palestinian life, work is equally distributed among men and women, and the former are expected to work in the kitchen as well as the latter.

Make a habit of glancing through the classified advertising columns. They may have a surprise in store for you.

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