Now-editorial Notes

The resolution adopted by the House of Deputies and approved by the House of Bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church, by unanimous vote, expressing sympathy for the victims of persecution of minorities, is a praiseworthy act. In these days when so-called Christian governments are indulging in the sport of inhuman persecutions and discriminations against minorities on religious or racial grounds, even the ordinary expression of public opinion in favor of decency and humane consideration for the oppressed must be regarded as an achievement.

The resolution of the convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church reads:

“Just as the recourse to offensive warfare is to be unsparingly condemned, so, in the opinion of the general convention, persecution of minorities as an instrument of national policy is likewise to be branded as unworthy of civilized nations and as shocking to the sensibilities of all right-minded persons.

“To all Jewish people and to all other minorities who may have been victims of such persecution, the general convention, in behalf of church people everywhere, extends a fraternal greeting and a message of deep sympathy.”

This resolution is somewhat weakened by the inclusion of the phrase “as an instrument of national policy.” It would have been more effective and far-reaching if the resolution had read, “persecution of minorities is likewise to be branded as unworthy of civilized nations and as shocking to the sensibilities of all right-minded persons.” Condemnation of such persecution merely as an instrument of national policy is limited only to persecution by the government. It would be fitting for a religious body to condemn also religious persecution and race hatred by individuals.

It is quite possible that there was no intention on the part of the Protestant Episcopal Church to limit itself to the condemnation of persecution of minorities as an instrument of national policy only. At the present moment the effect of this resolution should make itself felt in Naziland, for it is definitely directed against its national policy, which is unworthy of civilized nations and as shocking to the sensibilities of all right-minded persons.

CONGRESS HOUSE

Congress House, the club for German refugees, both Jews and Gentiles, to be opened next month in New York, is a most worthy and necessary institution. It is intended to offer temporary residence to German refugees, pending arrangements for more permanent settlement, to serve as a social and recreational center, and also as an information center in cooperation with other agencies seeking to care for German refugees.

Numerous organizations, in addition to the United Jewish Appeal, have been raising funds for the relief of German refugees. All sorts of concerts, banquets and other affairs have been arranged for the purpose of aiding German refugee physicians, German Jewish refugee children, and undoubtedly a great deal of good has been done. But there has been but little coordination in the individual efforts of well-meaning and generous people, and there has been no center where the German refugees could meet and where they could obtain definite information regarding their new problems in this country.

The women of the American Jewish Congress, and particularly Mrs. Stephen S. Wise, who organized the new Congress House for German Refugees, are to be congratulated upon their fine initiative and splendid achievement.

Barney Aaron, pugilist, born in London in 1800, met and defeated some of the most formidable fighters of the day. He was known as “the Star of the East.”

NEXT STORY