Book Tells of U.S. Race War

book asserts that “the anti-Nazi campaign of ‘a certain Jewish congressman’ will probably do more to make anti-Semitism than all the Silver Shirts could accomplish by themselves in a millenium.”

Without publicity, the boycott of German goods would have been much more effective, the authors believe, and might, perhaps, have had less serious political and social consequences for the Jews themselves. The boycott has not only created counter-propaganda and threats of a boycott on Jewish business. “It has also alienated a great host of Americans and Canadians who have felt that the more insistent Jews were seeking to plunge both the United States and the British Empire into an economic impasse with Germany at a time when there was every reason for economic stability and when Europe was constantly hovering on the brink of war. It must, however, be stated that many Jews did not approve of the boycott,” the book states.

The Institute of Social and Religious Research, which assumes responsibility for the publication, was organized in 1921 “as an independent agency to apply scientific method to the study of socio-religious phenomena.”

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