3 Parleys Open in Washington

Harold P. Ganss, president of the Washington Brotherhood, and Allen V. Deford, in charge of convention arrangements. The general discussion revolved around the “national program of activity” with discussions by Hugo Levy of Brooklyn, B. L. Frankel of Philadelphia, Maurice Jacobs of Philadelphia, Isaac Joffe of Lawrence, L. I., and Ralph E. Grossberg of Chicago.

“The work of religious education is as valid to the cause of human welfare as is social service. As imperative as it is to respond to the needs of suffering people wherever they may be equally necessary is it to maintain our institutions of learning and culture,” it was stated by Mrs. Henry Nathan of Buffalo, acting president, in her address before 300 delegates to the eleventh biennial assembly of the national Federation of Temple Sisterhoods.

“Religious education is the keystone of character building. To save a body through philanthropy, without also preserving a spirit, is not accomplishing our full duty,” Mrs. Nathan said in concluding her address with a plea for continuation and intensification of educational projects of the Sisterhood Federation.

Mrs. Morris Cafritz, president of the Washington Hebrew Sisterhood, in her address of welcome to the delegates suggested that “we should not only discuss practical sisterhood problems and activities in the assembly, but formulate some plan to further inter-religious friendship.”

Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt will receive the 300 delegates to the eleventh biennial assembly of the sisterhoods at the White House at 4 p. m. tomorrow.

Formal opening of the triple convention will take place at 8 o’clock tomorrow night at the Hotel Washington, but the brotherhoods stole a march by convening at the hotel this afternoon to hear Harold Ganss, president of the Washington Hebrew Brotherhood, give an invocation.

When the convention proper gets under way tomorrow, Jacob W. Mack of Cincinnati. chairman of the executive board of the union, will speak on “What the Union of American Hebrew Congregations has Accomplished in Two Years.” Greetings will be extended by Mrs. Henry Nathan, Buffalo, acting president of the sisterhood federation, and by Samuel B. Finkel, Boston, president of the brotherhood federation. A reception for the 1,500 delegates and guests will follow in the ballroom of the Hotel Washington.

The remaining sessions of the union and the sisterhood will be held at the Willard Hotel, and those of the brotherhood at the Washington.

Among other features there is to be a series of democratic discussions of vital subjects in Jewish life. This will be in the form of a forum entitled “Judaism and American Ideals” to be held Sunday night and attended by the delegates of the three allied bodies. A. Leo Weil, Pittsburgh, will preside. The principal speaker will be Judge Solomon Elsner, Hartford, Conn. Rabbis William B. Schwartz, Lawrence, J. I., and Julius Mark, Nashville, Tenn., will lead the discussion.

The brotherhood discussions will revolve around “The National’s Program of Activity” and “A Rounded Program for a Local Men’s Club.”

The sisterhood group, with a membership of 55,000 women, has in its twenty-two years become the largest organization of reform Jewish women in the country. Its primary interests lie in the field of religious education.

A review of the work of the past two years will be presented to each of the organizations. Plans for the next two years will be discussed, and the foundation for new activities laid.

A joint business meeting of the three organizations will be held on Monday afternoon. At this meeting inter-organizational problems of administration and activity will be brought up. Methods for dealing with future activities will be discussed and formulated.

The council will close with separate meetings of the executive board of the union and the sisterhoods on Tuesday when the officers for the coming term will be elected.

Under the reign of the thirteenth century of king of Poland, Boleslaw the Bashful, many Jews were carried off as slaves by invading Mongols.

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