Board of Education Bars Instructor’s Trip to Study Nazi Methods

The Board of Education last night struck a blow at Nazism when it refused a two month leave of absence to Theodor Huebner, assistant director of foreign languages, on which he was to have studied foreign language instruction in the countries of Central Europe. Mr. Huebner was to have made the trip as member of a commission sponsored by the Carl Schurz Foundation.

The board voted four to three against granting the leave, which had been previously recommended by the Board of Superintendents.

James Marshall, newly-made vice-president of the board, in a speech prior to the vote denounced the Nazi regime, stating that at this time “there is nothing in the teaching methods of Germany which we wish to use here.”

Mr. Marshall emphasized that the Nazi regime “interferes with parochial schools” and prohibits Jewish children from attending the German public schools.

Voting with Mr. Marshall against the leave of absence were Commissioners Ellsworth B. Buck, Dr. Alberto Bonaschi and Johanna M. Lindlof. President Henry C. Turner, Mrs. Margaret McAleenan and Walter C. Carlin voted for the leave.

Mr. Marshall’s statement follows:

“I know that the Carl Schurz Foundation has done some splendid work. As far as I can learn Mr. Huebner is in every way an excellent man, well acquainted with his subject, and worthy of his position. The German language is a fine language and it has a marvelous literature.

“This proposal is to send Mr. Huebner to Germany at this time to study the teaching methods in German schools. Now, there may be some who think that at this particular time the German schools can teach us anything about teaching. I do not believe, however, that in a country where the government interferes with the parochial schools, as it does, that in a country which prohibits Jewish children from entering into its school system, that in a country which forbids Masonry, which legislates and wipes out from existence Union Labor and which uses such things even as the sportsmanship of the Olympic Games for purposes of propaganda, such a country can teach us anything about teaching methods. It seems to me that we who are interested in freedom and in American principals would learn nothing about teaching over there at this time, and consequently I vote against the resolution.”

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