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Ban on Political Uniforms Seen As “mosley Cure”

Adoption of the “Scandinavian system” of barring “uniforms that are a symbol of political allegiance” is being advocated by British opinion as means of checking the menace of Sir Oswald Mosley’s Fascist bands, it was reported today by the New York Times London correspondent, Charles A. Selden.

By the “Scandinavian system” Mr. Selden refers to legislation enacted in Denmark, Sweden and Norway, soon after the Hitler government came into power, banning political uniforms as a way of combatting Nazi activities. The result of such laws, says Mr. Selden, “has been that neither Fascism nor Nazism has made any headway in those countries.”

Home Secretary Sir John Simon’s “leisurely legalistic approach” to the problem of British Fascism has provoked much criticism from all sides, the writer declares, since the demand for action is further strengthened by “the fact that Sir Oswald takes advice both from Berlin and Rome as to how to manage his political organization in this country.

“It is reported and widely believed that Sir Oswald’s tactics of deliberately leading his Black Shirts into such Jewish communities as Manchester, Leeds and the East End of London were based on advice given to him by Dr. Joseph Goebbels, German Propaganda Minister.”

Mr. Selden cites a municipal regulation passed by the City Council of Manchester prohibiting political uniforms which was tested Sunday at a Mosley meeting.

“Their attempt to produce an effect without the Black Shirt Uniforms,” concludes the correspondent,” was a ridiculous farce, which was greatly enjoyed by a small crowd. To prevent derisive laughter one speaker began the usual vituperation against Jews, which these Fascist speakers have all learned by heart from Sir Oswald himself. But the speaker was immediately stopped by a police inspector.”

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