Reich Cancels Jews’ Passports; Emigrants with U.S. Visas Not to Be Halted
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Reich Cancels Jews’ Passports; Emigrants with U.S. Visas Not to Be Halted

Passports of all German Jews living within the Reich have been cancelled by a decree issued by the Ministry of the Interior. The Jews were ordered to turn passports in at a local police station within 15 days. German Jews temporarily abroad must turn in their passports within 15 days after returning to the Reich.

Those passports still stamped “good for travel abroad” may again become valid if a special visa of the Interior Ministry is granted. Passports good only for travel within the Reich will be replaced by identity cards, bearing the holder’s fingerprints, which will be issued before Jan. I.

In recent months Nazi authorities had already made the passports of a very large number of German Jews invalid for travel abroad. Only in special cases, particularly for the purpose of final emigration, have Jews been able to leave the country.

(American Consul Raymond Geist obtained from the German authorities assurance that the order would not halt intending emigrants to the United States who had received American visas, the Associated Press reported. In conferences with the Gestapo and with the foreigners’ department of the regular police he obtained agreement that such passports would be revalidate.)

Persons seeking visas at the United States Consulate were “urgently requested” to pay the fees in dollars instead of marks. consular officials suggested that american relatives provide the foreign exchange. Most steamship lines were also refusing to accept marks for passage, some quarters expressing the opinion that this was a temporary measure because of transfer difficulties. Meanwhile, would-be emigrants having only marks are forced to travel on German ships exclusively.

In Bellevue Park, where stand the Government building and a palatial residence for the accommodation of distinguished visitors, posters were put up announcing that Jews are forbidden to enter. The park adjoins the famous Tiergarten in the heart of the city.