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Exodus from Reich Goes on As Persecution is Intensified; Exiles Face Closed Borders

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Driven by intensified persecution, thousands of Jews continue to seek their way from the Greater Reich to other countries despite the closing of borders.

A report received today by the HIAS-ICA Emigration Association from Amsterdam said that 1,700 Jewish refugees were ready sail from the Netherlands ports for overseas lands after obtaining visas from consulates within and outside the Reich, but still needed fare. Another report declared that more than 2,000 Jews, after undergoing Nazi torture in Vienna and Prague, had arrived on Danube barges and small boats in Rumania, penniless and exhausted, in the hope of being able to emigrate overseas.

A special ship may be chartered for those who reached Amsterdam to transport them to Latin American countries for which they have secured visas. However, the position of the 2,000 in Rumania is more complicated since they were forced out of Germany without visas for any other country.

In France, the authorities, in line with Interior Minister Albert Sarraut’s declaration in Parliament several days ago that interned refugees would be dealt with liberally, yesterday released one group of refugees to sail for Palestine and another to sail for the United States. Those released are holders of visas for these two countries and are the first to be released en masse. They were freed on condition they emigrate immediately. Losing no time, the Palestine-bound refugees sailed from Marseille, while the holders of the American visas are the first to be released en masse. They were freed on condition they emigrate immediately. Losing no time, the Palestine-bound refugees sailed from Marseille, while the holders of the American visas are en route to New York on the Italian liner Conte di Savoia.

Consideration for refugees has also been displayed by the military authorities, who have agreed henceforth not to take refugees off neutral ships passing French waters, provided that the HIAS-ICA Emigration Association in Paris submits to the naval authorities in advance the names of the ships and lists of the refugees aboard who are sailing from neutral countries or embarking for overseas lands.

The same procedure has been followed by the British naval authorities with regard to 57 Jewish refugees travelling to Australia on the steamship Maloja, according to cabled advices received by the HIAS-ICA from Bombay. Since these refugees came from Germany and Austria they were detained while passing British waters and were interned. However, the Jewish Relief Association in Bombay was authorized by the military authorities to interrogate them, after which they were released. This association also informed the HIAS-ICA that of 333 Jews interned in India, 287 have been released and the rest are expected to be released shortly.

The British consulate in Paris is still in possession of valid Palestine visas in the capitalist category assigned to refugee applicants not yet released from internment. It is certain, however, that they, as well as others holding visas for overseas lands, will be released and permitted to emigrate.

Sir Herbert Emerson, League of Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, has concluded a five-day visit to Paris during which he discussed the problem of the interned refugees with the French police and military authorities, who displayed sympathy with his task. Sir Herbert also conferred with directors of the HIAS-ICA in Paris on the problem of arranging emigration from France of those refugees who will be permitted to leave isolation centers. The French authorities expressed to Sir Herbert their especial satisfaction with the holders of Nansen passports, of whom all of military age have joined the French Army.

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