Anglo-jewish Association Postpones Submission of Palestine Memorandum to Government

The Anglo-Jewish Association, at its general meeting today, unanimously decided to postpone submitting to the government its memorandum on Palestine which has provoked strong Zionist opposition. The memorandum was referred back to a special commission which is to consider the details and the form of the document as well as when it is to be presented.

It was revealed at the meeting that leaders of the Association have consulted Dr. Weizmann regarding his views on the document. Anthony de Rothschild, who was one of the speakers, emphasized that “the main purpose of the memorandum was to be helpful.” From a practical viewpoint, he said, the Anglo-Jewish Association considers that the memorandum could be more helpful than more far-reaching demands. Leonard Stein, president of the Association, pointed out that it is obvious that if the memorandum is accepted by the British Government it would replace the present White Paper policy and would thus cause jubilation among all Zionist groups.

The memorandum urges a “fresh start” for Palestine. It stresses the fact that the whole country benefited from the development of the Jewish National Home there. It also points out that Palestine made a worthy contribution to the Allied cause during the war, and can also make a major contribution to the welfare of the entire Middle East during peace time if given full facilities for immigration and for the use of the natural resources of the country.

FOUR-POINTS PROGRAM OUTLINES DEMAND FOR NEW DEAL FOR PALESTINE

Expressing the hope that future British policy with regard to Palestine will provide maximum aid for the alleviation of Jewish distress, the memorandum of the Anglo-Jewish Association outlines the following four principles;

1. The government of Palestine should be conducted-with necessary administrative changes-for the further development of the Jewish National Home within an undivided Palestine; it should facilitate and expedite Jewish immigration and settlement; it should promote the utilization of the country’s economic resources in order to create conditions conducive to the attainment of the status of a self governing territory under a constitution designed to meet the special needs of the country within the British Commonwealth, or closely associated with it.

2. The government, in consultation with the Jewish Agency, should prepare plans now for the settlement in the shortest possible period, as soon as possible after the cessation of the hostilities in Europe, of as many Jews as desire, with the assistance of the Intergovernmental Committee for Refugees and of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration.

3. The Palestine constitution shall provide that religion or race is not a criterion for Palestinian citizenship. No Palestine government shall have jurisdiction and authority over persons outside of Palestine who are not Palestinian citizens.

4. This policy should be carried out as an integral part of post-war settlement in the Middle East in conjunction with measures for further progress and prosperity of the Arab states. It will contribute generally to the peaceful development of the Middle East.

BOARD OF DEPUTIES ASKS ESTABLISHMENT OF PALESTINE AS JEWISH STATE

While the Anglo-Jewish Association carefully refrains from demanding the establishment of Palestine as a Jewish State, this demand is made by the Board of Deputies of British Jews in a declaration published today in the Zionist Review, official.

1. The Board of Deputies of British Jews looks to His Majesty’s Government to secure that the United Nations, in laying down the policies governing the post-war settlement, declare that Palestine be designated to become, after an agreed period of transitional government, a Jewish State or Commonwealth. All Jews who wish to make their home in Palestine, shall have the right of entry, settlement and citizenship, in accordance with its laws, it being provided that nationality of the Jewish State or Commonwealth shall be confined to its own citizens, and shall not, in the terms of the Balfour Declaration, prejudice “the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.”

2. That, having regard to the traditional interest of the British people in the ideals and aspirations of the Jews in relation to Palestine and Great Britain’s historic role in creating the Jewish National Home, the Board hopes that the Jewish State or Commonwealth may find an appropriate and legally secured place within the British Commonwealth of Nations.

3. That the Constitution of the Jewish State or Commonwealth shall guarantee the equality of rights of all citizens of Palestine irrespective of race, religion or language, and this equality shall be secured by international guarantee.

4. That, during the transitional period, before the full establishment of the Jewish State or Commonwealth, the Jewish Agency, recognized under the Mandate as the authorized representative of the Jewish people in relation to Palestine, be vested with authority to direct and regulate immigration into Palestine, to develop to the maximum the agricultural and industrial possibilities and the natural resources of the country and to utilize the uncultivated and unoccupied lands for Jewish colonization and for the benefit of the country as a whole.

That within the general scheme of post-war reconstruction the United Nations should take into account the need of Jewish reconstruction and, upon the cessation of hostilities and the liberation of the European territories, provide facilities for the speedy transfer to Palestine of the Jewish survivors of Nazi persecution who may wish to settle in Palestine, and grant, for this purpose, appropriate financial and other resources as part of the general scheme of post-war reconstruction.

6. That the rights of the respective religious authorities with regard to the Holy Places shall be internationally guaranteed.

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