Unity of All Jewish Groups Necessary to Achieve Post-war Demands, Says Brodetsky

A “working agreement” among the various Jewish organizations in the United States, the Board of Deputies of British Jews and Jewish groups in other countries is necessary in order to secure “a reasonable response” to any Jewish demands that will be presented to United Nations post-war parleys, it was stated here today by prof. Selig Brodetsky, President of the Board of Deputies.

Prof. Brodetsky, who is returning to England after spending several weeks conferring with American Jewish leaders, told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that preliminary steps toward achieving such unity were mapped out during his visit here, and he expressed the hope that no Jewish group will allow a “separatist attitude” to hinder formation of a unified Jewish front.

He expressed appreciation for the cordiality extended both to him, and to A.G. Brotman, executive secretary of the Board, by Zionist groups here and the large national Jewish organizations, and the opportunity given them “to acquire knowledge and make proposals.” Dr. Brodetsky stressed that upon American Jewry, the largest and most powerful in the world, devolves the chief responsibility for protecting the welfare and interests of world Jewry. British Jews, he added, are eager to participate in this task and have already done “proportionately more” than any other Jewish community in regard to Palestine and general problems.

The English Jewish leader said that he felt that a decision on a Jewish Commonwealth in Palestine should be made now, although a transition period would be necessary during which the required political changes could be made. During the waiting period, he said, as many Jews as possible should be brought to Palestine in order to achieve a Jewish majority there.

The presence of American Jewish soldiers in Britain, prof. Brodetsky declared, has given a spur to the efforts of British Jews to provide for Jewish service men and women welfare and recreational facilities, and has helped to bring the two communities closer together.

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