Sweden Asks U.N. to Charge Security Council with Enforcing Decision on Palestine

A proposal that the U.N. Security Council be charged with enforcing the eventual decision of the General Assembly with regard to the future status of Palestine was made today by Sweden at the U.N. Ad Hoc Committee on Palestine.

Speaking for the Swedish delegation, Rickard Sandler announced that Sweden is prepared to support the UNSCOP partition recommendations as a “reasonable and workable solution,” along with regulated Jewish immigration, but emphasized that “any solution within the framework of the UNSCOP report must have the support of all the permanent members of the Security Council,” that is of the five great powers.

Analyzing Jewish-Arab relations, Sandler urged that “useful” discussion be based not on involved historical and legal explanations, but on present political and economic factors. He was hopeful that economic necessity may guide Jews and Arabs to “much closer cooperation,” leading eventually to a “United States of Palestine” which would be welcomed into membership in the U.N.

WANTS “LIMITED” JEWISH IMMIGRATION; SAYS THIS WILL BRING PEACEFUL SOLUTION

So far as future Jewish immigration into Palestine is concerned, Sandler said that “it must be permitted, but limited.” Without limitation, he said, it would be impossible to attain a peaceful solution. “It is illusory to believe,” he declared, that the creation of a Jewish state would solve the problem of all Jewish DP’s.”

Emir Adel Arslan, Syrian representative, warned against “attempts to be generous to the Jews at the expense of the Arabs.” The Syrian reiterated the usual Arab contentions that the Zionists were hatching plots against Palestine, influenced Jewish voters in certain countries, incited Jewish DP’s against returning to their own countries and were responsible for the dismissal of former UNRRA director in Germany Sir Frederick Morgan.

The representative from Pakistan, who has made himself a spokesman for the Arabs, proposed the end of general debate today, although none of the great powers has yet spoken, but was ruled against by chairman Herbert Evatt who set Saturday as the closing date for the list of speakers. Evatt also suggested Monday midnight as the deadline for receipt of new proposals to be considered by the committee. Earlier, watt let it be known that the United States would probably speak on Saturday, and this was held likely in informed American circles.

The first Hebrew broadcast by the U.N. will be made tomorrow when it sends its first weekly shortwave transmission to Palestine. To be made by the Palestinian Journalist and radio commentator A. Medzini, the broadcast will be transmitted for ten minutes every Friday morning to the Palestine Broadcasting Corporation which will relay it within Palestine Friday nights.

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