U.S. Will Not Prevent Nationals from Joining International Palestine Constabulary

The United States will not send any troops to Palestine, but will not prevent American citizens from joining an international volunteer constabulary, if such a force is recruited by the United Nations, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency was informed today by highly authoritative Washington sources.

Elaborating on the statement made by U.S. delegated Herschel Johnson at the Ad Hoc Committee on Palestine (see attached supplement), in which he said that America favors partition, these sources made it clear that in referring to the creation of an international force in Palestine for service during the transition period, Johnson meant that such a force would be recruited by the United Nations not on the basis of representation from states which are members of the U.N., but from individual volunteers. The same sources emphasized that the American attitude regarding such an armed force is that it should be a constabulary only, and not participate in military operations against any outside country.

Johnson’s statement was received with great satisfaction by many delegations as paving the way for a final solution of the Palestine problem. Most of the smaller delegations are awaiting with great interest the supplementary statement by Britain, which is expected to be made tomorrow and the stand of the Soviet Union, which will be outlined either tomorrow or Tuesday. In all, 18 more delegations are to be heard from before debate concludes before the Ad Hoc Committee.

FINAL JEWISH AGENCY TESTIMONY AT AD HOC BODY SCHEDULED FOR END OF WEEK

The Jewish Agency, which expressed gratification at the U.S. statement, although pointing out that it required some clarification, isnow engaged in preparing additional testimony which is scheduled to be presented after the Committee has heard from all other nations who have indicated that they wish to speak. The Agency’s statement, which is expected to take a full day to present, will be submitted orally by Moshe Shertok, chief of its political department.

The Johnson statement also elicited praise from Dr. Abba Hillel Silver, head of the Agency office in the U.S., and from the American Zionist Emergency Council, which speaks for all major Zionist bodies in the U.S. The Council stressed, however, that the area of the proposed Jewish state must not be further whittled down.

The Arab states reacted violently, with spokesmen accusing the U.S of selling out to “Jewish capitalists” and bowing to domestic political pressure. Syrian delegate Faris el Khouri revealed that the Arabs plan to contest the validity of the Palestine Mandate and the Balfour Declaration before the International Court of Justice. He warned the U.N. against establishing a volunteer force, asserting that U.S. espousal of such a plan confirmed “the threat of force made last week by Dr. Silver.” The Arabs “will accept Dr. Silver’s challenge,” he added.

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