Menu JTA Search

Britain Denies Backing Jordan Against Israel in Border Tension

A British Foreign Office spokesman today denied Israel Premier David Ben Gurion’s charges that Britain had discriminated in favor of Jordan in recent border incidents. The spokesman said Britain had taken into account incidents caused by Jordanians, but drew a distinction between small and unorganized incursions and large-scale military operations. He claimed that Jordan had taken steps to prevent incidents and had punished Jordanians responsible for them.

A suggestion by Clement Davies, leader of the Parliamentary Liberal Party, that the Arab states and Israel should settle their differences and make peace at direct talks was officially rejected today by the Jordan Embassy here.

Mr. Davies had proposed, in a letter in the Times of London, that the British Government take the lead in bringing about such direct peace talks. A peace settlement, he declared, “would be of advantage not only to the two sides directly concerned, but also to all interested in the peace, security and welfare of the Middle East.

“This settlement,” he added, “would at once lead not only to a solution of the refugee problem, water and other border problems, but would enable the governments and peoples to cooperate together in enterprises which would quickly bring benefits, social and material, to all.

“We are deeply concerned in all matters affecting the governments and peoples of the Middle East, their welfare and security. Has not the time come when, in conjunction with our allies, we should take a real step forward to try to bring to an end the present unsatisfactory and dangerous situation, and that is, to use the full weight of our influence to persuade the governments to enter into direct negotiations with a view to a general peace settlement? Surely, in the interests of all, it is worth our while to try.”

NEXT STORY