Denver Reports Shift in Jewish Demands for Philanthropic Aid

An increasing demand for the assistance of the Jewish Family and Children’s Service, with a shift in emphasis from new Americans to local residents and from economic problems to personal adjustment questions, was reported here at the annual meeting of the service.

Dr. Alfred M. Neumann, director of the service, also stressed the problems of aging people and warned that “this is a problem growing in scope as we go along.” He urged immediate consideration of the establishment of a sheltered workshop for the aging that could also accommodate physically and emotionally handicapped people.

“While there is a steady decrease of economic problems, difficulties around personal adjustment, like marital problems, parent-child relationship, tend to be brought to our attention more frequently,” Dr. Neumann reported.

He pointed out that in October, while the service had to deal with 24 economic problems, there were 58 situations dealing with personal adjustment-family relations, 30 health and maternity problems and 15 old age problems. Among others, the service also dealt with eight resettlement cases and 24 problems dealing with immigration and naturalization.

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