Eisenhower and Eden Announce Decision on Arab-israel Conflict

President Eisenhower and British Prime Minister Sir Anthony Eden made known today, in a joint statement, that they have made arrangements for joint discussions, involving the United States, Britain, and France, to decide the nature of action in the event of the use or threat of force to violate Arab-Israel frontiers.

The two leaders termed an Arab-Israel settlement “the most urgent need” and said “this will be possible only if both sides are willing to reconcile the positions which they have hitherto taken.” Readiness was declared by the heads of the two governments to financially assist in a solution of the Arab refugee problem and by guaranteeing “agreed” frontiers. Expansion of the United Nations truce supervisory organization will be favorably considered.

Stating that their purpose was to mitigate the war risk increased by Soviet bloc munitions shipments to the Middle East, Eisenhower and Eden said: “We believe that the security of the states in this area cannot rest upon arms alone but rather upon the international rule of law and upon the establishment of friendly relations among neighbors. Support was expressed for the Baghdad Pact and the United States will continue to give the pact backing.

TEXT OF EISENHOWER-EDEN STATEMENT ON MIDDLE EAST

The text of the Eisenhower-Eden statement pertaining to the Middle East reads: “We discussed the tensions which prejudice the stability of the area and carry a potential threat to world peace. It was agreed that every effort be made to decrease sources of misunderstanding between this area and the Western world. We are eager to contribute wherever possible to the settlement of difficulties between states in the region. We wish to help peoples of this part of the world achieve their legitimate aspirations.

“A settlement between Israel and her Arab neighbors is the most urgent need. This will be possible only if both sides are willing to reconcile the positions which they have hitherto taken. Our two governments have declared their readiness to contribute to such a settlement by assisting financially in regard to the refugee problem and by guaranteeing agreed frontiers.

“In the meantime we are concerned at the state of tension in the area and have considered what steps can be taken to reduce it. The Tripartite Declaration of May 25, 1950, provides for action both inside and outside the United Nations in the event of the use of force or threat of force or of preparations to violate the frontier or armistice lines. We are bound to recognize that there is now increased danger of these contingencies arising. Accordingly, we have made arrangements for joint discussions as to the nature of the action which we should take in such an event. The French Government is being invited to participate in these discussions.

“We believe that the security of the states in this area cannot rest upon arms alone but rather upon the international rule of law and upon the establishment of friendly relations among neighbors. The action of the Soviet bloc in regard to arms supplies to Middle East countries has added to the tensions in the area and increased the risk of war. Our purpose is to mitigate that risk.

“We express full support for the efforts of General Burns, head of the United Nations Truce Supervisory Organization, to maintain peace on the borders. We would favorably consider recommendations for any necessary enlargement of his organization and improvement of its capabilities.

“We discussed the work of the Baghdad Pact and agreed upon its importance for the security of the Middle East. We noted that this association, in addition to its defense aspects, has an important part to play in the economic and political development of member countries. We believe that it serves the interests of the area as a whole and provides no reason for impairing the good relations we wish to maintain with non-member countries. The United States Government will continue to give solid support to the purposes and aims of the pact and its observers will play a constructive part in the work of its committees.”

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