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Dulles Expects Israel’s Withdrawal from Gaza and Akaba Areas

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Secretary of State John Foster Dulles told a press conference today that he has grounds to hope Israel will comply with United Nations demands for immediate withdrawal from the Gulf of Akaba and the Gaza Strip.

Asked if the United States favore.l sanctions against Israel, Mr. Dulles said this country would not act unilaterally but would act in accordance with UN decisions. As to whether the United States favors sanctions to compel Israel compliance on withdrawal, he would not answer directly. He said the issue depended on the United Nations and the U.S. actions would be taken within that context.

Explaining why he felt Israel would withdraw, Mr. Dulles said Israel was a country, like most free countries, which has a decent respect for the opinion of mankind, He added that Israel depends for its future existence on international good will. Therefore, he felt, Israel will heed the UN vote,

Mr, Dulles made clear that he had no information on what Israel planned to do. But he thought a country with the traditions and democratic instincts of Israel and which was itself a creature of the UN, would respect UN wishes.

The Secretary of State said Egypt also could be expected to respect the voice of the General Assembly on Suez Canal passage of Israel shipping. He admitted that no effort was made previously to put moral pressure on Egypt in this connection. Now, he said, there was a greater recognition of the problem. He hoped greater tranquillity would come and felt also the moral views of nations would influence Egypt.

Mr. Dulles refused to say whether King Saud of Saudi Arabia has been asked about discrimination against personnel of Jewish faith which bars them from the Dhahran air-base. He said he preferred not to comment while talks were in progress.

Commenting on the status today of the 1950 Tripartite Declaration, Mr. Dulles said the United States at “least” abides by it but he was not sure other parties feel bound by it. He still consider it a valid statement of U.S. policy. No discussion has been held on a U.S., British, French meeting on the tripartite question he said. But, he added, it was normal in due course that talks will be held later by President Eisenhower bilaterally with Britain and France.

Mr. Dulles said he did not think the story of the recent Middle Eastern crisis could be told to Congress now. He said it was a kind of story which should not be told until it has become a matter for the historians rather than the politicians.

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