Israel’s International Position Greatly Improved, Evaluation Shows

As Abba Eban, chairman of Israel’s delegation here, visited Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold today, prior to departure for Israel, an evaluation of Israel’s current international position revealed that:

1. At the United Nations, none of the Western governments is thinking at present of pushing toward fundamental settlement of the basic Arab-Israel disputes, but are interested rather in consolidating the present period of relatively stable Arab-Israel relations.

2. A vast improvement is discernible in the relations between Israel and many governments in Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa.

3. Israel has recuperated entirely from the heavy loss of good will it encountered among high officials of the United States Government as a result of the 1956 Sinai campaign. Ant illustration of U.S. attitude toward Israel is the fact that, during the fiscal year that ended this week, Israel had received from the U. S. a total of $90,000,000 in development loans, scientific aid, technical assistance and agricultural commodities. On the very last day of the last fiscal year–last Monday–Israel obtained more than $6,000,000 worth of agricultural surpluses from Washington.

Mr. Eban’s visit to Mr. Hammarskjold followed by two days a similar conference, held in Washington, with Secretary of State John Foster Dulles. The Israeli diplomat expects to leave next Tuesday and will return late next month or early in September. Despite reports of forthcoming changes among Israel’s top-ranking representatives both here and in Washington, it is known that Mr. Eban will again head Israel’s delegation here when the General Assembly convenes on September 16.

Israel’s major policy, to be followed at the next Assembly, will be among the subjects of Mr. Eban’s consultations with his government. Another topic, it is understood, will be the relations between Israel and American Jewry. Israelis here are known to be of the opinion that Israel must recognize American Jewry as being thoroughly American in character. From that thesis follows the belief among Israelis here that, while Israel’s existence may be a central factor in the American Jewish community, Israel must not try to dictate the course of Jewish development in this country.

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