Number of Americans Inclined to Vote for Jew As U.S. President Increases

A new Gallup poll on attitudes of American voters toward the idea of a Jew running for President indicated today a substantial increase in the number of those who would vote for such candidates. The findings were based on two polls on the question, one made in 1958 and one made in the latest poll.

The question put to the sample was: “If your party nominated a generally well-qualified man for President and he happened to be a Jew, would you vote for him?”

In 1958, 62 percent said they would, 28 percent said they would not and 10 percent replied “don’t know.” In the current poll, 68 percent said they would, 23 percent said they would not and nine percent said they didn’t know.

An interim survey–made during the winter 1959-60 spurt of synagogue defacing and other anti-Jewish acts–found 72 percent as reporting they would vote for a Jew for President, 22 percent opposed and six percent in the “don’t know” category.

The latest poll found that younger persons show less prejudice than older people and that college-educated respondents were less biased than those with a high school education.

Those in the 21 to 29 year age group replied as follows: 76 percent would vote for a Jew, 16 percent would not and eight percent didn’t know. In the 30 to 49 year bracket, the percentages were 71, 21 and eight. In the 49 years and over bracket, the percentages were 62, 28 and 10.

College graduates replies were: 83 would vote for a Jew, 11 would not and six “don’t know.” High school respondents had these percentages: 73, 20 and seven. Grade school respondents replied: 55 percent would, 33 percent would not and 12 percent didn’t know.

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