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Eshkol Wants American-soviet Limitation of Flow of Arms to Middle East

Prime Minister Levi Eshkol today told a Chicago press conference that Israel hopes the United States can reach an agreement with the Soviet Union to limit the flow of conventional arms into the Near East so that the funds can be used for peaceful development.

In speaking of the Egyptian threat to Israel, and Israel’s deterrent capacity, Eshkol said the U.S. Government was not too eager to help Israel acquire ground-to-ground missiles. But he expressed general confidence in deepening American friendship.

He expressed hope that West Germany will adopt an effective law to remove German rocket scientists from Egypt and that implementation will be efficient. He said a law had been proposed but that its implementation would have to be observed. On another subject, the Premier expressed hope the new Premier of India would normalize relations between India and Israel.

The Prime Minister indicated there were signs that President Nasser of Egypt had become more aggressive toward Israel since the visit by Soviet Premier Khrushchev to Egypt. He said that “whether it is the influence of Premier Khrushchev you can never tell, but, of course, if Khrushchev promised to open his arsenal in the service of Egypt, this may influence them.”

The Premier stressed that President Nasser “is always the first to introduce more sophisticated weapons.” He said this “demands from us to be on guard.” He enumerated late model Soviet equipment acquired by Egypt.

In response to questions on nuclear developments in Israel, he said that Israel hoped to use nuclear power for such peaceful uses as industry, agriculture and science, including medicine. He said “we hope to become a big medical center because we believe that peace will come.” He said it might take five or ten years but that this was the philosophy of his Government.”

HONORED BY CHICAGO MAYOR; AWARDED DEGREE BY ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY

Prime Minister Eshkol reached the climax of his American tour today by being made an honorary citizen of Chicago. He was also awarded an honorary degree by Roosevelt University, and otherwise received a rousing reception from Jewish and non-Jewish elements in Chicago.

Mayor Richard J. Daley of Chicago awarded a Medallion of honorary citizenship to the Premier at a session of the Chicago City Council, honoring him. The Mayor was joined by a number of aldermen and other civic leaders in remarks of tribute to Israel. Crowds outside the City Hall sang Hebrew songs and offered a rousing ovation.

At a luncheon tendered in honor of the Prime Minister by Jewish community organizations, Mr. Eshkol lauded Israel’s ties with Chicago. He was introduced by Col. Jacob Arvey, civic leader, and Philip M. Klutznick, former Ambassador to the United Nations. The Premier praised the pro-Israel roles of both Col. Arvey and Mr. Klutznick and also lauded Chicago Jewry in general.

Roosevelt University conferred the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws on the Prime Minister in recognition of his achievements. Addressing the university audience, the Prime Minister called for an era of international peaceful development, emphasizing the need to avert war and to exploit scientific and economic opportunities involving a massive educational program and the constructive use of knowledge and capital.

The Prime Minister met with representatives of Jewish community organizations at the Palmer House where a luncheon was given in his honor. He said he was impressed by the dynamism and pioneering spirit of Chicago and of the vigor of Chicago Jewry.

He met informally at the Drake Hotel with former West German Defense Minister Franz Josef Strauss when the latter paid a courtesy call on the Prime Minister.

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