World Jewish Congress Backs U.N. Decision on Racial Discrimination

Action to mobilize support of Jewish communities throughout the world in behalf of United Nations efforts to eliminate racial discrimination was pledged by the Governing Council of the World Jewish Congress at the close of its meeting here today.

The delegates, representing 64 Jewish communities and Jewish organizations, approved plans to hold the organization’s fifth plenary World Assembly in Brussels July 31 to August 10, 1966. The plenary will review the Jewish position in various parts of the world, define Jewish attitudes on the major problems of the present time and consider measures to revitalize the spiritual and cultural life of Jewish communities and to secure the survival of the Jewish people.

The London meeting was attended by representatives of the WJC executive branches from Europe, North and South America and Israel. Dr. Nahum Goldmann, WJC president, and Israel M. Sieff, vice-president, presided. Dr. Goldmann hailed the adoption of a draft convention on elimination of all forms of racial discrimination by the Social Committee of the U.N. General Assembly last week as a major breakthrough in the campaign to protect and extend human rights which the WJC has conducted for the past 32 years.

He said that “for the first time, effective international machinery has been devised to protect human rights and freedoms.” The draft, which awaits approval by the full Assembly, will come into force with ratification by 27 member states. It will enable individuals and groups to lodge complaints and seek redress in cases of abuses of human rights and freedoms on racial grounds.

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