International Youth Congress Appeals to Moscow on Soviet Jewry

The Eighth Congress of the International Congress of Socialist Youth ended here with a resolution deploring “the restrictions imposed by the Government of the USSR on the freedom of movement and cultural freedom of the Jewish minority in the Soviet Union.” The resolution urged that, in conformity with the Soviet Constitution, Soviet Jewry be given the opportunity “to participate in its own cultural life in the same way as other minorities do.”

The resolution also appealed to Soviet authorities to give to Russian Jews the possibility to travel, to leave the Soviet Union at will and that war-separated Jewish families “be given an opportunity for reunion in a place of their choice speedily.”

The problems of Soviet Jewry received special attention during the convention. Sture Ericson, retiring secretary of the group, called on the World Federation of Democratic Youth, which is dominated by the Komsomol, the Soviet Communist youth organization to issue a positive statement on Soviet Jewry. He cited such action by some Western Communist parties as an example. The Italian, Belgian, Norwegian and Swiss delegates expressed their sympathy with the Jewish minority in the Soviet Union. The resolution, which was approved unanimously, was proposed by a Swiss delegate and seconded by a delegate from India.

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