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Cairo Reportedly Sticks by Hard Line Adopted at Khartoum Parley

Diplomatic sources here said today that information received on the Eban-Jarring meeting indicated that Egyptian intransigence on moves toward peace was as great as ever and that Dr. Jarring had made no progress. The sources said Egyptian diplomats had not abandoned the position of no negotiations; no recognition and no peace with Israel adopted at the Khartoum Arab summit meeting last summer. Despite a softer line of talk, the sources said, Egypt continues to insist that any settlement must exclude recognition and a formal peace treaty and that they are unwilling to negotiate with Israel.

Cairo’s interpretation of the Nov. 22, 1967 Security Council resolution which authorized Dr. Jarring’s mission, the sources said, was that the phrase concerning the goal of a “just and durable peace” does not necessarily mean a peace treaty but simply a settlement of the Arab-Israel dispute by “peace means” which would not include explicit recognition of Israel by Egypt and would be achieved through intermediaries.

The United States has informed Israel that there was no truth in British press reports that Washington had agreed to a “timetable” for implementation of the Nov. 22 resolution. Informed sources said the matter had been checked with the U.S. after the British press reported that British Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart had sought to persuade Secretary of State Dean Rusk to accept that approach as one way to end the impasse in Dr. Jarring’s diplomatic efforts. The sources said Israel previously had received reliable information from Britain that the British Government remained committed to its original view that all provisions of the resolution had equal value and that any Arab-Israel agreement would be a package transaction.

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