Rights League Will Ask Thant to Intervene for Suffering Jews in Arab Countries

Charges that the governments of Egypt, Syria and Iraq are violating rights of Jews living in those countries will be presented to United Nations Secretary-General U Thant tomorrow on behalf of the International League for the Rights of Man. The charges are contained in a memorandum to be submitted by Roger N. Baldwin, honorary chairman, who contends that the three Arab states are acting contrary to “the spirit as well as the letter of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” Mr. Baldwin will ask Mr. Thant to treat the memorandum as “a communication on human rights” under provisions of the UN Economic and Social Council and urge him to intervene with the governments to alleviate sufferings of the Jewish minorities. The charges are based on reports that Mr. Baldwin terms “reliable.” They say that in Egypt, between 225 and 250 Jewish men have been imprisoned since the June, 1967 Arab-Israel war without permission to contact relatives or counsel and have been subjected to abuses that include torture. Most of the 1,000-2,000 Jews remaining in Egypt have been deprived of their jobs and their assets have been confiscated, and since last September the policy of permitting Jews with necessary funds to leave the country has apparently been stopped, the memorandum says.

In Syria, “repressive measures continue against the 4,000 remaining Jews. They are forbidden to move outside 1.5 miles of their homes without special, permission, they may not sell or dispose of property and they may not emigrate,” Mr. Baldwin says. In Iraq, according to the memorandum. Jewish homes are under surveillance by security police, Jews are forbidden to dispose of property without permission, licenses issued to them have been cancelled and they are restricted in collecting debts owed them. In addition, the memorandum charges, all companies have been ordered to discharge their Jewish employes. About 25 of 100 Jews arrested immediately after the June, 1967 war remain in prison despite a general amnesty for political prisoners and despite the fact that no charges have been brought against them. “They are not permitted to have visitors or counsel or to receive food and clothing. Some were beaten and tortured.” the memorandum says.

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