U.S. Pilots Association Favors Sanctions to Combat Air Piracy

The Air Line Pilots Association of the United States announced today that it had recommended a policy of sanctions to its international federation “to combat air piracy.” Charles H. Ruby, president of the U.S. organization, said at a press conference that the recommendation urged “sanctions with respect to airports in any country which is henceforth unwilling or unable to provide the necessary security within its political jurisdiction against sabotage or air piracy.” The recommendation would have the International Federation of Air Line Pilots Associations (IFALPA), notify affected countries of discontinuance of operations based on insufficient security measures. Before service would be resumed, according to the recommendation, the country’s effective political entity must sign an agreement stating full compliance with the Tokyo convention on offenses committed on board aircraft,” and also “must agree to return saboteurs or all persons involved in air piracy to the country of registry of the affected aircraft for trial in connection with the commitment of such crime.” IFALPA’s principal officers also would “conduct inspection for acceptable security measures at all operational airports before service would be resumed.” IFALPA’s principal officers are meeting today and tomorrow in London to consider the U.S. pilots’ recommendations, a spokesman for the American organization said. The recommendation follows a series of meetings by the American and international organizations in the wake of the hijacking early in September by Arab guerrillas of four airplanes which they later destroyed, and the attempted hijacking of an El Al plane which was foiled.

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