U.S. Action to Aid Soviet Jews in Rome Due to Action of Many

Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson’s action in using his parole authority permitting 800 Soviet Jews now in Rome most of whom are without U.S. visas, to speedily enter this country was the result of a combined effort by many persons, Gaynor I. Jacobson, executive vice-president of United Hias Service, told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency today. Jacobson revealed that President Nixon approved Richardson’s decision which was based on a recommendation of the State Department. “We are profoundly appreciative of everything the President and members of his Administration did,” Jacobson said.

Max M. Fisher of Detroit, played a major role Jacobson reported. “Mr. Fisher’s part in this matter was of prime significance,” he said, “and we are indebted to him for his zeal, compassion and thoughtfulness.” Fisher, according to Jacobson, conveyed the urgency of the situation of the 800 Jews to Nixon. Fisher, former president of the National Council of Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds, is chairman of the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel, a vice-president of United Hias Service and honorary chairman of the national United Jewish Appeal.

Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D.Mass), and other leaders of Congress, especially Representatives Peter W. Rodino Jr. (D.NJ), and Joshua Eilberg (D.Pa.), also manifested a deep interest in helping the 800 refugees who have been waiting in Rome for several months. “Their concern was most gratifying,” Jacobson remarked. “The support of Congressional leaders of both parties meant a great deal in resolving the problem.”

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