Diaspora Response to Yom Kippur War

The response of the diaspora to the Yom Kippur war was discussed here yesterday by Moshe Rivlin, Director General of the Jewish Agency and member of the Executive, who stopped over in London on his way to New York. He told the JTA:

“We used to think that the response of the diaspora in 1967 had been the limit of what the diaspora could do in its partnership with Israel. But we were wrong. It is already clear today that in terms of contributions towards meeting the human needs of Israel while she was engaged with the war, and is now engaged in the aftermath, the diaspora has done three times better than in 1967. The target in 1967 was $400 million the target now is $1.25 billion and we are sure that this target will be met. Already, now, we have received more than the total of 1967, and there are pledges still to be redeemed, and the campaign is only half-way.”

Enumerating the human needs, which the Agency is now catering on its own, Rivlin said that aliya, absorption, social services and education were self-evident. “Rousing too, with 18,000 dwelling units to be built in the next six months. And settlement continues. But there were expenses as a direct result of the war. Forty-three border settlements suffered damage. Irrigation pipes had to be replaced. Electricity supplies had to be restored. School buildings had to be repaired. The shattered economy of development towns had to be reconstructed. Those were burdens upon the Jewish Agency, and this was the sense of the present emergency campaign.”

NEXT STORY