Congressional Hearings on Brown Seem Uncertain with Ford Away

The likelihood of Congressional hearings on the anti-Semitic remarks of Gen. George S. Brown, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, remained uncertain today as Congress returned from its election recess. The matter is not expected to be determined for a week or more and may be held in abeyance until President Ford returns from his Far Eastern trip Nov. 26.

The President personally rebuked Brown at a meeting in the White House to which the General was summoned last Thursday. But the President also made it clear, at his press conference in Phoenix, Ariz, later that day, that he had no intention of firing Brown because of his “one mistake.”

Jewish organizations, Including the Jewish War Veterans of the U.S., are continuing to demand Brown’s ouster and many members of Congress have expressed reservations about his continuing to occupy the nation’s highest military pool

Stating a view shared by others at the Capitol who were shocked by Brown’s remarks, Sen. Howard O. Metzenbaum (D.Ohio) told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that he saw “nothing to investigate” the Brown case. He noted that the General had admitted making the slurring remarks and had apologized for them. Therefore, the Senator questioned what an Inquiry would prove. He said, however, that more Important than what Brown said was the General’s state of mind as revealed by his remarks. “Brown’s remarks, put in the context of the kind of thinking he represents is the issue. He ought not remain as the nation’s military commander,” Metzenbaum said.

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