Yeshiva University Launches $100 Million Expansion Campaign

A $100 million “Century Campaign” aimed at developing and expanding Yeshiva University in terms of its faculty, curricula and physical plant, was launched at the university’s 55th annual Chanukah dinner here last night. Dr. Norman Lamm, president of the university, announced that the campaign hoped to achieve its goal by 1986, when the university celebrates its 100th anniversary.

Stanley Stern, vice chairman of the Board of Trustees and dinner chairman, reported to the 1000 assembled guests that prime contributors closely associated with Yeshiva University have already pledged $16 million to spearhead the nationwide effort. In addition, the university’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine will undertake a separate $25 million development campaign on the occasion of its 25th anniversary in 1980.

Lamm spoke of the need to preserve and enrich a culture of learning and a commitment to humankind represented by Yeshiva University. “To assure the continuing vitality of this tradition of scholarship and concern for one’s fellow man is our highest priority,” he stated.

He said the “Century Campaign,” backed by a nationwide advertising effort, afforded “a rare opportunity and challenge to meet the university’s immediate and long-term needs” and would enable the institution to explore new directions of service to its primary constituencies, the nations and the Jewish community. “We must collectively assure that the legacy we leave for the coming generation will be an institution that is financially strong and free of onorous past financial obligations,” he said.

EIGHT OBJECTIVES OUTLINED

Lamm outlined the campaign’s eight objectives. These are: strengthening academic offerings by establishing at least 30 endowed professorial chairs through individual endowments of $750,000 and $1 million at the various graduate schools and $250,000 at the undergraduate level; developing new courses and new instructional materials to improve core curriculum and establish innovative programs in such areas as nursing, accounting, information sciences, psychology, social work, biomedical research and Jewish studies.

Also to develop and maintain distinctive programs linking undergraduate, graduate and professional schools with new interdisciplinary programs and cooperative efforts; intensifying services to the general and Jewish community; attracting talented students; renovating and rehabilitating physical facilities; increasing private research support; and insuring fiscal stability.

In keeping with the theme of dedicated chairs and facilities, Lamm announced the dedication of the Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein Chair in Homiletics at the university-affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. Lookstein, who was senior rabbi of Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun in Manhattan at the time of his death earlier this year, had led the congregation for more than 50 years and was an alumnus of Yeshiva University.

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