Wolf Foundation Announces Its Chemistry Awards for 1986

The Wolf Foundation prize for chemistry for 1986 is to be shared by research scientists from the U.S. and Switzerland, the Foundation announced here last week, in the first report on the prestigious prizes for this year. Prof. Elias James Corey of Harvard University, and Prof. Albert Eschenmoser of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich will share the $100,000 award. Eschenmoser is the first Swiss recipient of the Wolf Prize.

They are being honored for their outstanding research on the synthesis, stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms for the formation of complex natural products, especially Vitamin B-12, the announcement said.

The $12 million Wolf Foundation was established in 1976 by German-born Dr. Ricardo Wolf who worked and lived for many years in Cuba, which he represented as Ambassador to Israel, staying on here after his friend, Fidel Castro, became the Cuban leader. Wolf died in 1981.

The Israeli Minister of Education and Culture serves as chairman of the Wolf Foundation Council, and the prizes are awarded to the laureates by the Israeli President at a May ceremony in the Knesset.

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